Cities Are Providing Drivers A Smart Way To Park

Photo courtesy of SPI

Parallel parking, back-in parking, getting blocked in a space, loading and unloading zones, private parking only… the ordeals of parking are just as long as the lots that are full. But, technology is changing the way we park.

by Kristin Gordon

Parking your vehicle in a congested part of town can be just as stressful as the drive to get there. Of course there is the thrill of driving behind a pedestrian who has bags in hand and is heading towards their vehicle to leave.

Disappointment sets in as they unload their bags, but don’t leave or forget where they parked and leave you behind on parking deck Z.

There is also the stress of getting to the parking meter before it expires or wishing you hadn’t fed the machine such a large quantity of coins.

Parallel parking, getting blocked in a space, loading and unloading zones, private parking only… the ordeals of parking are just as long as the lots that are full. But, technology is changing the way we park.

Testing is taking place for Cyber Valet Services, which allows vehicles equipped with special programming to park without a driver on board in connected car parks.

The driver exits the vehicle at the car park entrance and activates the automatic parking system using a smartphone to park itself and returning when the driver is ready to leave.

Car parks using this technology are equipped with Wi-Fi, video sensors and artificial intelligence-based solutions.

In Georgia, the city of Atlanta’s ATLPlus app allows drivers to pay by phone and extend parking time without having to return to their vehicle or to a meter.

The app will also alert drivers when they have 15 minutes on their parking time. Customers can also notify a rapid response team if they spot a broken meter. This team is expected to fix the meter within 24 hours.

In Maryland, the city of Wheaton is also installing smart meters that allow drivers to use coins, credit cards or they can pay through their cell phone. The old meter poles will remain, but the inner workings of them will be updated with the new technology. Law enforcement have access to the meters and can tell if they are expired or in use. All of the meters are solar powered.

In Texas, the San Antonio Airport is using a parking guidance system which uses license place recognition technology and directional signage to help guide drivers to the nearest available space. The signage displays real-time parking availability throughout the entire facility of over 1,200 spaces. The parking technology also provides surveillance cameras which captures streaming video whenever motion is detected in or around a space.

A program called Trucker Path was launched in 2015 to help truckers locate parking in their vicinity. The free service is constantly updated and verified by a community of truckers to ensure its accuracy. It provides drivers a trip planner with detailed information about truck-friendly points-of-interest along the way including hotels, weigh stations, truck stops, truck washes, restaurants and rest areas.

The smart-meter trend is growing and there are several cities throughout the United States requesting information and proposals to update their parking experience for drivers.

In New York, the city of Rochelle is seeking to update and modernize its 750 on-street meters to accommodate smart growth and planning for the city. The selected vendor will be required to sign a service agreement for a term of three years with an option to renew for two additional three-year terms. The request for proposals is due by Aug. 3.

In Florida, the city of Delray Beach is looking to eliminate free street-side parking downtown, including the parking garages, by adding smart parking meters to its 3,000 plus parking spaces. The meters would change cost per hour depending on demand, similar to surge pricing. The plan will require the city to hire additional personnel to enforce the meters and city commissioners want to look at cost estimates and revenue projections before approving the meters.

Currently, the parking garages charge a $5 flat fee after 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and other parking spots downtown are free 8-hour or 2-hour parking.

In Louisiana, the city of Lafayette is experimenting with smart meters and would like to phase out the city’s 630 coin-operated meters. The smart meters could accept credit cards, sense if a vehicle is in a parking spot, update parking rates and allow drivers to sign up for a payment system through their cell phone.

City council members plan to vote on July 11 whether to move forward with the meter installation and begin charging drivers through dynamic pricing or demand-responsive pricing. The proposed changes would also allow the city to set aside certain parking spaces for electric vehicles and offer vehicle charging services at those sites.

In South Carolina, the city of Charleston approved a budget for smart parking meters after reviewing a parking study that was completed in the fall. Each meter is expected to cost between $800 and $900. The budget will also be used to establish parking on the first floor of parking garages and new signs.

With increasing adoption of these efficient real-time parking systems the demand is expected to increase at airports, hospitals, shopping malls, commercial parking garages, universities and other event avenues.

The strong integration of the real-time parking system, Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud data is opening new avenues for the users and manufacturers.

If you are looking for a different way to pay for parking, a company called TravelCar will let you park for free, but you have to be willing to let someone else borrow your car. The Paris-based car sharing service turns parked cars into cash for their owners, offers free airport parking and helps travelers earn money by renting out their car to other travelers while they are away. 

If you agree to let your car be rented by other travelers while you’re traveling, you get free airport parking. Your car is protected with $1 million in liability insurance and is covered against theft and physical damage. You also get paid for every mile that’s driven. If your car is not rented, you still get free parking.

From a renter’s perspective, you get access to a private car rather than paying the cost of renting from traditional rental car companies. If you’d rather not share your car, you can still park with TravelCar and receive the lowest airport parking rates guaranteed.

TravelCar launched its U.S. operations on June 14 with an office in Los Angeles. Founded in 2012 and based in Paris, TravelCar is currently operating in 30 countries in 200 locations. They are slated to open at a San Francisco location in July, followed by eight additional U.S. markets this year.


This story originally published by Strategic Partnerships, Inc.

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