Commissioners Court Proclaims May As Drug Court Month, Notes Success Of Veterans Treatment Court

Commissioners Court Proclaims May As Drug Court Month, Notes Success Of Veterans Treatment Court
Photo Credit To Hays County | Left to right, Precinct 2 Commissioner Mark Jones, Precinct 1 Commissioner Debbie Gonzales Ingalsbe, , Veterans Treatment Court Program Manager Gerald Ramcharan, County Court-at-Law #2 Judge Chris Johnson, Case Manager Laura Balo, Precinct 3 Commissioner Lon Shell, and Precinct 4 Commissioner Walt Smith.

Hays County Courthouse, San Marcos, TX – The Hays County Commissioners Court on Tuesday proclaimed May as Drug Court Month and thanked County-Court-at-Law #2 Judge Chris Johnson and the staff of the Veterans Treatment Court for providing a needed service in Hays County.

Johnson thanked the Court for its support of the program, saying, “we are setting an example for how drug courts should be run.”

The Veterans Treatment Court is designed to help treat the reason the problem exists and give the offender an incentive to succeed. First-time offenders who meet the program’s eligibility requirements participate in a wraparound program that identifies their needs, sets them up with resources and monitors their progress for up to two years.

The program, funded by grants, helps reduce recidivism among veterans by giving them the treatment and services they need through a strictly supervised military-style civilian program.

Precinct 1 Commissioner Debbie Gonzales Ingalsbe said that the Veterans Treatment Court proceedings “really touch your heart,” and the commitment shown by the veterans is impressive. “It’s not an easy program,” she said.

“You’re setting an example for the County as it creates additional treatment courts in the future,” Precinct 3 Commissioner Lon Shell said.

Since the Veterans Treatment Court began four years ago, 73 veterans have graduated from the program, with only 3 re-offenses occurring.

According to the proclamation drug courts have proven to help save lives, increase public safety, cut taxpayers cost, and keep families whole. According to the National Association of Drug Court Professionals, drug courts have served more than 1.5 million individuals. They can reduce re-offense rates by as much as 58 percent and save an average of $6,000 per drug court participant.


 

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